Healthcare Compliance Tips: OIG Compliance 101
Healthcare Compliance Tips: OIG & HCAA Resource Guide

Healthcare Compliance Tips: OIG Work Plan

Monitor the OIG’s Work Plan at least monthly

Each week in our series called, The Comeback Story: 9 Compliance Resources to Level Up Your Practice, I have been sharing resources every practice should utilize asap.

And the third resource I advise you to pay attention to is the:

OIG Work Plan

Purpose:

This plan was created to provide you with a snapshot of various projects that are already underway during the current fiscal year. The updates discussed in this plan include upcoming OIG audits and evaluations which includes other government agencies (e.g., Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, National Institutes of Health, etc.) in the process as well.

How to Use It:

Originally, this plan was updated once or twice a year. However, with the healthcare industry rapidly changing, the OIG has enhanced the transparency around their work efforts, and will now provide monthly updates.

As stated on their website, OIG has identified areas that need the most attention, and they also set priorities accordingly. While evaluating potential projects, the factors that they consider important are:

  • Mandatory requirements for OIG reviews, as set forth by laws, regulations, and in other directives.
  • Requests made or concerns raised by Congress, HHS management, or the Office of Management and Budget.
  • Top management and performance challenges currently facing the HHS.
  • Work performed by other oversight organizations (e.g., GAO).
  • Management actions used to implement OIG recommendations from previous reviews. Also, used as a potential for positive impact.

If you can’t tell already, this is a game changer for your compliance program!

The OIG Work Plan is just like an open book test. The potential projects are provided ahead of time, and then it is up to you to review and apply to your practice.

On their website, check out the “Recently Added Items” and “What’s New” page. My suggestion is for you to include this information in your arsenal of compliance resources to use as you implement and monitor your compliance program.

 

**The opinions and observations from the group/author are not a promise to exempt your practice from fines and penalties.  Research, modify and tailor the advice to fit your specialty

Joi Sherrod, MPH, CPC, CPCO
Joi Sherrod, MPH, CPC, CPCO
Joi is an educator and owner of JNC Healthcare Compliance Group. After working for distinguished academic teaching hospitals and clinics, she is passionate about helping medical, dental, and behavioral health practices rethink healthcare compliance one trend at a time. Contact Joi at info@jnccompliance.com.